First Intel® Edison project – DSLR Camera Controller

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I’ve been working on camera hacks for a couple of year now. It started with the CameraPi, which was a Raspberry Pi mini-computer stuffed into an old battery grip for my Canon 5D Mark II Camera. Then came various variants on that, including a DIY time-lapse rail, the results you can see in the time-lapse section of this website. Theres’ also some water droplet photography, automated focus stacking, and even a bark activated door opener, not to mention the PiPhone.

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Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone Black, Intel Edison – Benchmarked.

IMG_1062bRecently I took delivery of an Intel Edison with a Mini-Breakout Board. I was awestruck by the size of the thing, but it was not until I started using it properly for a couple of projects that I noticed that it seemed a little bit ‘snappier’ than boards I’d used in the past (Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone Black). So I decided to do a little benchmarking.

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PiPhone – A Raspberry Pi based Smartphone

IMG_0872cHere’s my latest DIY project, a smartphone based on a Raspberry Pi. It’s called – wait for it – the PiPhone. It makes use an Adafruit touchscreen interface and a Sim900 GSM/GPRS module to make phone calls. It’s more of a proof of concept to see what could be done with a relatively small form factor with off-the-shelf (cheap) components. I don’t expect everyone to be rushing out to build this one, but I had great fun in doing it, as it builds quite nicely on my previous projects, especially the Lapse Pi, a touchscreen time-lapse controller, and uses most of the same hardware.

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Adafruit Led Ampli-Tie

Just a short post this time. When I saw this project on the Adafruit Learing System (learn.adafruit.com), I thought it was so cool that I had to build one myself. It’s a sound-activated LED tie!

There’s a great tutorial here: http://learn.adafruit.com/led-ampli-tie,  so jump on over if you want to see how it’s made.

Just for kicks, I did a quick 28 second video of it in action. I can’t wait for the next hackerspace / coderDojo /  work night out 🙂

 

 

Lapse-Pi Touch – A Touchscreen Timelapse Controller

SZ0A4263So here’s my latest Raspberry Pi project. It uses the PiTFT Mini Kit, which is a 320×240 2.8″ TFT display and Touchscreen from Adafruit Industries that fits neatly onto my Raspberry Pi, to control a user interface to drive the back-end time-lapse script I showed you in a previous blog article.

 

 

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Lighting Foregrounds in Night-Time Time-Lapses

Here’s a quick hack to make your night-time time-lapse sequences a bit more interesting. As a general rule of thumb, it’s always good to have a decent foreground in your landscape images. I believe that this also stands true for time-lapse photography, as well as night time time lapse photography. The problem is that it’s dark. Very dark. So, how about we artificially light the foreground during the shoot? But we’d have to have it lit for 2 or 3 hours?

Normally for shooting star fields, to get an interesting foreground we’d “light paint” the foreground with a torch, and through trial an error, we’d get an exposure that looked right. This doesn’t work for time-lapse, as it would be impossible to get consistent exposures for each frame. So, use a stable light source that will last the several hours that you need for the full time-lapse. Continue reading “Lighting Foregrounds in Night-Time Time-Lapses”