Author Archives: daveh

3D-printed DSLR Timelapse Controller

Here’s a new revisison of a type of device I’ve been playing with for a long while, a DSLR Timeplapse Controller. This one is ESP8266 based, and creates a hotspot to allow you to set up the timelapse parameters, and easily run a timelapse from your smartphone.

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Posted in openlapse, Photography

openlapse Time-Lapse Rail Interactive 3D Models

Here’s a few 3D models of the time-lapse rail I’ve been working on. I’ve put a good bit of time into the models, as I feel it’s a good way of showing how the construction is done for the various parts of the rail. The last model is of the complete rail. I still have a few parts to add, like the Tripod Head and WiFi Antenna, but they do demonstrate the construction nicely.

See the Github repo for models, electronics designs, laser cutting info, software, etc. I’m adding more and more to that as I get the time. In the near future there should be enough info for people to easily build their own rails. And there are other posts in this blog showing more. Be sure to check them out.

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Seeed Studios Versus OSH Park Shipping to Ireland

So I ordered three sets of PCBs from OSH Park (USA) and Seeed Studios (China). They were ordered very close to each other. Here’s a breakdown on how quick they got here, and how much they cost. Interestingly, they all shipped the same day (June 5th).

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Posted in openlapse, Photography Tagged |

Flashing the OpenLapse binary

In order to use the OpenLapse controller, it’s necessary to flash the firmware onto it. This article describes how to do that, and when you’re complete, you should be able to connect into the ‘openlapse’ WiFi hotspot with your smartphone and control your DSLR and motor. Even if you don’t have the additional hardware, you can still play with the user interface. I’d appreciate feedback. 🙂

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OpenLapse Timelapse Controller Parts and Assembly

Here’s the first in a series of posts on my Open Source Hardware project, entitled OpenLapse, which is a rail system for timelapse photography, including everything from the electronics, software, and physical hardware designs. It’s an evolution of a previous project, the Raspberry Pi based Timelaspe Rail, but this is designed to be simpler to build and use. A web interface is presented from the controller which generates a WiFi hotspot, and the user can chance the parameters for the timelapse, as well as manually control the motors on the rail.

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Posted in Uncategorized

$5 WiFi enabled Smoke/Gas Detector

 Following on from my last post about my DIY Intruder Alarm, I thought I’d post about another wee device I’ve hooked up to it, a Smoke/Combustible Gas/Carbon Monoxide detector that’s WiFi capable, for about $5.  Continue reading »

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DIY Intruder Alarm System

 Over the past few months, I’ve been building a DIY Intruder Alarm, so here’s a brief overview of it’s layout and functionality. It’s based on a Raspberry Pi, but there’s nothing to say that it couldn’t be based on any single board computer with an adequate number of GPIO inputs, Up-board, Minnowboard, Beaglebone, etc.

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Laser-cut face-plate for Heating System

As I’ve learned while doing home automation, it’s important for the finished project to look good, especially if it’s in a location that can be seen. 🙂

So when I was building the home-heating controller (as described here),  I decided to finish it off with a laser-cut face-plate.

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Wifi Home Heating Oil Monitor

This bit of Home Automation has been on my list for a long time. I usually find out that the home heating oil (kerosene) has run out when an orange light is illuminated on my boiler. At that stage, we’ll probably be without heating in the house for a day or two. So, I was looking at ways to measure the level of home oil in the tank that would give me a constant level indicator, and also not break the bank.

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Posted in Home Automation

DIY Smart Home Heating Control System

I finally bit the bullet and uninstalled the Nest Thermostat that I got a couple of months ago. I was not happy with it’s ability to keep my house at a stable temperature. There was also the problem of the circulation pump feeding the heated water to the radiators (covered elsewhere on this blog).

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Posted in Home Automation